The purpose of health education is to develop health-literate students—students who acquire the knowledge and possess the skills needed to engage in meaningful and health-enhancing lifetime behaviors.

  • In grades K-3 sexual education is not addressed but rather Social-Emotional Learning. These standards can be found here
  • In grades 4-12, instruction addresses information about:
    • The physiological, psychological, and sociological developmental processes experienced by an individual; (WSD covers these topics in grades 5-8, and HS);
    • Abstinence and other methods of preventing unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases; (WSD covers these topics in grades 5-8 and HS);
    • Health care and prevention resources;
    • The development of intrapersonal and interpersonal skills to communicate, respectfully and effectively, to reduce health risks and choose healthy behaviors and relationships based on mutual respect and affection, and free from violence, coercion, and intimidation;
    • The development of meaningful relationships and avoidance of exploitative relationships;
    • Understanding the influences of family, peers, community, and the media throughout life on healthy sexual relationships; and
    • Affirmative consent and recognizing and responding safely and effectively when violence or a risk of violence is or may be present, with strategies that include bystander training. 
    • The tables below outline specific content addressed in each grade band. “Grade-level outcomes are provided as examples only and do not represent a required course of instruction.” (OSPI Website Requirements by Grade Section)

Parent Notification:

Parents and guardians must be notified in advance of planned instruction, must be able to review all Comprehensive Sexual Health Education instructional materials, and must be given the opportunity to opt their child out of CSHE instruction. If you wish to opt your child out you can access the form here

In Woodland, we adhere to a more proactive communication plan than recommended. 

Middle School Parent Notification: 

At the middle school, our practice is to communicate with parents when the topic will be addressed two months in advance via the school newsletter. This communication also includes information about the parent preview opportunity and the date that parents can attend to learn more and preview materials.  Then a month before instruction, the parents are notified again but in a specific email addressing the topic. The opt-out form is attached to this email (they do not have to request the form-it is automatically provided to all parents). If parents intend to have their child opt-out, we do not require the actual form or have a firm deadline. If they call or email their request any time prior to instruction with the request to opt their child out, we honor the request.

As we receive opt-out requests the office keeps a list and those students are invited to different learning activities in a separate location during the time the content is addressed. 

High School Notification:

At the high school level, most of the communication comes from the classroom teacher to parents both to inform them of the upcoming content and the opportunity to opt-out. We intentionally selected the high school curriculum because it requires parent participation throughout the units to ensure continued parent engagement as topics are addressed.  

 In Woodland, we have and will continue to give ample notice of when this topic will be addressed in school, provide an opportunity for families to preview the instructional materials, and give parents the opportunity to opt their child out.  

Grades K-3

In Woodland, we do not address the sexual health education standards in grades K-4.

Beginning in the 2022-23 school year, schools must provide social-emotional learning (SEL) to students in grades K-3, consistent with SEL Standards and Benchmarks.  SEL provides skills to do things like cope with feelings, set goals, and get along with others.

Grades 4-5

Required topics of instruction are described in SB 5395, with a focus on helping students understand and respect personal boundaries, develop healthy friendships, and gain a basic understanding of human growth and development. Currently required HIV/STD prevention instruction will continue to be required.

 In Woodland, we provide 5th-grade instruction on the following topics with the following resources:

5th Grade Health Standards

Curriculum

Understand functions of reproductive systems.

Identify ways to manage physical, social, and emotional changes that occur during puberty.

Describe how puberty and physical development can vary considerably.

Recognizing puberty prepares the body for reproduction.

Define Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Human Growth and Development Videos 

Fifth Grade KNOW Curriculum

 

Grades 6-8

Required topics of instruction are described in SB 5395, with a focus on helping students understand and respect personal boundaries, develop healthy friendships and dating relationships, gain a deeper understanding of human growth and development, develop skills to support choosing healthy behaviors and reduce health risks, including abstinence and other STD/pregnancy prevention approaches, and understanding the influence of family and society on healthy sexual relationships. Currently required HIV/STD prevention instruction will continue to be required.

“The purpose of health education is to develop health-literate students—students who acquire the knowledge and possess the skills needed to engage in meaningful and health-enhancing lifetime behaviors. The 2016 Health Education K–12 Learning Standards provide schools with a foundation for implementing standards-based, age-appropriate instruction for each student.  (Page 8 of the Standards Introduction Document).”

 

In Woodland, we provide 6th-8th grade instruction on the following topics with the following resources:

6th Grade Health Standards 

Curriculum

Identify parts of the reproductive systems.

Identify physical, social, mental, and emotional changes that occur during puberty.

Define abstinence and explain why it is the most effective method to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STDs), including HIV. 

Explain how STDs are transmitted and prevented.

Identify examples of protective factors and risk behaviors.

Explain the importance of talking with a family member and other trusted adults about relationships.

Identify ways to communicate effectively in a variety of relationships.

Recognize that everyone has the right to set boundaries based on personal values.

Understand which sexual health care services are available to youth. 

Understand that there are behaviors that constitute sexual offenses.

Understand that it is illegal to send or post sexually explicit images or messages electronically. 

Human Growth and Development Videos

6th Grade KNOW Curriculum


NEW: Teachers will ensure students understand WA state laws related to behaviors that constitute sexual offenses, including electronic exchanges including sexual content. 

 

 

7th Grade Health Standards 

Curriculum

Describe reproductive systems including body parts and functions. 

Describe the stages of pregnancy from fertilization to birth.

Recognize there are differences in growth and development.

List and describe commonly used methods of birth control, including abstinence. 

Describe methods to prevent the transmission of STDs/HIV, including abstinence. 

Understand that all STDs are treatable and a health-related decision. 

Describe characteristics of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Demonstrate communication skills that foster healthy relationships. 

Explain the importance of setting personal boundaries and showing respect for the boundaries and values of others.

Identify laws related to accessing sexual health care services. 

Define sexual offenses as they relate to state law. 

Identify consequences of sharing sexually explicit pictures or messages.

Human Growth and Development Videos

7th Grade KNOW Curriculum


NEW: Teachers will ensure students understand WA state laws related to behaviors that constitute sexual offenses, including electronic exchanges including sexual content.

 

8th Grade Health Standards 

Curriculum

Summarize reproductive systems and their functions, including the path of an egg during ovulation and the path of sperm during ejaculation.

Identify physical, emotional, and social effects of sexual activity.

Describe the physical, social, mental, and emotional changes that occur during adolescence.

Summarize ways to prevent pregnancy and STDs. 

List steps to using a condom correctly.

Identify medically accurate resources about contraceptive methods, STDs/HIV, and pregnancy. 

Summarize signs, symptoms, potential impact, and treatment of STDs. 

Use a decision-making model to make a health-related decision.

Explain how to build and maintain healthy family, peer, and dating relationships. 

Define sexual consent and identify ways that consent can be communicated and accepted. 

Analyze the impact of technology and social media on friendships and relationships.

Develop a plan to communicate and maintain personal boundaries and values.

Understand laws related to accessing sexual health care services. 

Understand the importance of personal responsibility for sexual decisions. 

Identify state laws related to sexual offenses, including when a minor is involved. 

Explain the consequences of sharing sexually explicit pictures or messages

Human Growth and Development Videos

8th Grade KNOW Curriculum 


NEW: Teachers will ensure students understand WA state laws related to behaviors that constitute sexual offenses, including electronic exchanges including sexual content.



Grades 9-12

 

Required topics of instruction are described in SB 5395, with a focus on helping students understand and respect personal boundaries, develop healthy friendships and dating relationships, gain a deeper understanding of human growth and development, develop skills to support choosing healthy behaviors and reduce health risks, including abstinence and other STD/pregnancy prevention methods, how to access valid health care and prevention resources and understanding the influence of family and society on healthy sexual relationships. Currently required HIV/STD prevention instruction will continue to be required.

 In Woodland, we currently meet this requirement with the curriculum we previously adopted. 

High School Health Standards 

Curriculum

Summarize fertilization, fetal development, and childbirth. 

Explain the role hormones play in sexual behavior and decision-making. 

Describe the emotional, social, physical, and financial effects of being a teen or young adult parent. 

Describe behaviors that impact reproductive health. 

Describe steps of testicular self-exam and the importance of breast self-awareness. 

Explain the physical, social, mental, and emotional changes associated with being a young adult. 

Describe how sexuality and sexual expression change throughout the life span.

Evaluate the effectiveness of abstinence, condoms, and other contraceptives in preventing pregnancy and STDs/HIV. 

Demonstrate steps to using a condom correctly. 

Identify local youth-friendly sexual health services. 

Understand that people can choose abstinence at different times in their lives. 

Advocate for STD testing and treatment for sexually active youth. 

Use a decision-making model to make a sexual health-related decision.

Differentiate between affection, love, commitment, and sexual attraction.

Compare and contrast characteristics of healthy and unhealthy romantic and sexual relationships. 

Demonstrate effective ways to communicate with a partner about healthy sexual decisions and consent.

Analyze factors that can affect the ability to give or recognize consent to sexual activity.

Identify ways to access accurate information and resources for survivors of sexual offenses.

Describe laws related to accessing sexual health care services.

Understand the importance of personal and social responsibility for sexual decisions.

HS Examine laws and consequences related to sexual offenses, including when a minor is involved. 

Identify laws and concerns related to sending or posting sexually explicit pictures or messages.

Reducing the Risk


NEW: Teachers will ensure that students get age-appropriate instruction on affirmative consent and bystander training.


NEW: Teachers will ensure students understand WA state laws related to behaviors that constitute sexual offenses, including electronic exchanges including sexual content.

NEW Requirement

Sexual health education must ensure that students get age-appropriate instruction on affirmative consent and bystander training.

Affirmative consent is an approach to giving and receiving consent that includes clear, voluntary, enthusiastic permission to engage in sexual activity. It is not just the absence of “no.” In high school, it might focus on hand-holding, kissing, or sexual touch/activity, as well as virtual contact such as texts or emails or taking photos. Bystander training teaches students how to safely intervene when they see bullying, sexual harassment, or unwanted sexual contact. They are included in this legislation as a way for schools to combat the high rates of unwanted sexual contact experienced by youth in our state. 

Frequently Asked Questions 

Can parents opt their child out of sexual health instruction?

Yes, parents and guardians will still be able to opt their children out of sexual health instruction. Senate Bill 5395 strengthens this provision by requiring districts to honor parent/guardian requests. 

In Woodland, we adhere to a more proactive communication plan than recommended. 

Middle School: 

At the middle school, our practice is to communicate with parents when the topic will be addressed two months in advance via the school newsletter. This communication also includes information about the parent preview opportunity and the date that parents can attend to learn more and preview materials.  Then a month before instruction, the parents are notified again but in a specific email addressing the topic. The opt-out form is attached to this email (they do not have to request the form-it is automatically provided to all parents). If parents intend to have their child opt-out, we do not require the actual form or have a firm deadline. If they call or email their request any time prior to instruction with the request to opt their child out, we honor the request.

As we receive opt-out requests the office keeps a list and those students are invited to different learning activities in a separate location during the time the content is addressed. 

High School:

At the high school level, most of the communication comes from the classroom teacher to parents both to inform them of the upcoming content and the opportunity to opt-out. We intentionally selected the high school curriculum because it requires parent participation throughout the units to ensure continued parent engagement as topics are addressed.  

At what grade level does instruction on sexual health education begin?

Currently required HIV prevention instruction must begin no later than 5th grade. Required instruction for grades 4–5 focuses on helping students understand and respect personal boundaries, develop healthy friendships, and gain a basic understanding of human growth and development. 

How does HB5395 affect Woodland Public Schools?

We currently meet a majority of the requirements outlined in Senate Bill 5395. If you wish to review a full analysis of HB5395 and the implications for Woodland, you can read the full report here.  In summary, 

  • Prior to adoption, our current curriculum was reviewed by the community, board-approved, and has been in place for several years. It meets the basic requirements of the new law by adding topics we noted in the tables above. Therefore,  we do not have plans to adopt a new sexual health education curriculum at this time
  • We believe the human growth and development videos are somewhat dated and would like to consider videos that address the same content, but take place in the current setting. 
  • When any new curriculum is recommended, it is board policy to solicit community engagement and input in the process. In Woodland, we believe the practice of engaging our community is critical. Parental involvement, and support of any adoption, is a critical component our school board considers before approving any adoptions here in Woodland.
  • IF we pursue updated video content, we will follow board policy prior to recommendation for adoption.
  • In Woodland, we recognize the topic of sexual health and development is an important conversation between parents and their children. 
  • We have selected curriculum and practices that place a high value on parent partnership on the topic of sexual health education. 
  • We annually invite parents to preview materials. We also recognize the topic of sexual health and development is an important conversation between parents and their children and support opt-out requests for all parents who wish to address this topic directly at home and not have their child participate.
  • We communicate the opt-out request option early and honor these opt-out requests in which parents wish to address this topic directly at home and not have their child participate in the classroom instruction.
  • Our adopted curriculum is as follows:

                  Does the new legislation take away local flexibility?

                  No. School districts that don’t already have a curriculum in place will still work with parents, families, and the community to select or create a curriculum that best meets the needs of their students and communities.

                  Will OSPI need to approve district curriculum choices?

                  No. The new legislation maintains OSPI’s role in reviewing curricula for consistency with state requirements and making a list available for districts to use as a resource. The authority to approve curricula for use in schools currently rests with school districts and that will continue. Districts will need to provide the name of the curriculum they are using and describe how it meets state requirements, but OSPI does not have the authority to approve or deny districts’ choices.